Skip to content

FAQs

1. What is Tyblume™?

Tyblume is a prescription birth control pill that contains 2 types of female hormones, levonorgestrel, a progestin, and ethinyl estradiol, an estrogen.

2. Is Tyblume™ a low dose oral contraceptive?

According to the CDC, low dose oral contraceptives generally contain 30 micrograms of estrogen or less. Tyblume contains 20 micrograms of ethinyl estradiol so it is considered a low dose oral contraceptive.

3. How well does Tyblume™ work?

Tyblume is 99% effective at preventing pregnancy when used correctly.

4. Who should NOT take Tyblume™?

Your healthcare provider will not give you Tyblume if you have or have had blood clots, a history of heart attack or stroke, high blood pressure that medicine cannot control, breast cancer or any cancer sensitive to female hormones, liver disease or liver tumors, unexplained vaginal bleeding, if you take Hepatitis C drugs containing ombitasvir/paritaprevir/ritonavir, with or without dasabuvir, as this may increase levels of liver enzymes in the blood, or if you are or may be pregnant.

 

Also, do not take birth control pills if you:

· Smoke and are over 35 years old
· Are or suspect you are pregnant
· Have any unexplained bleeding from the vagina

5. Can I take Tyblume™ with my other medications?

Tell your healthcare provider about any medicines and herbal products that you take.

 

Some medicines and herbal products may make birth control pills less effective, including:

 

  •  barbiturates
  •  bosentan
  •  griseofulvin
  •  oxcarbazepine
  •  carbamazepine
  •  phenytoin
  •  rifampin
  •  felbamate
  •  St. John’s wort
  •  topiramate
  •  certain protease inhibitors

 

See Tyblume Patient Information for all drug interactions.

6. What are common side effects of birth control pills?

The most common side effects for combination birth control pills like Tyblume are headache, abdominal pain, nausea, menstrual periods with abnormally heavy or prolonged bleeding, vaginal candidiasis and pain, acne, and vaginal inflammation or infection.

7. Are there any serious risks of taking birth control pills?

Birth control pills containing both estrogen and progestin may increase the risk of serious blood clots, especially in women who have other risk factors, such as smoking, obesity, or are over 35 years old.

8. What is a thromboembolic event?

A thromboembolic event refers to the development of a blood clot that travels through your body and plugs a different artery in your lungs (causing a pulmonary embolism), your brain (causing a stroke), your kidneys, your gastrointestinal tract or your legs.

9. How will Tyblume™ affect my period?
  • You may experience light periods with Tyblume. Most women taking Tyblume had periods lasting less than 5 days.
  • You may experience breakthrough bleeding (bleeding between periods) and spotting, especially during the first three months of taking Tyblume. It may take time for your body to adjust to the new hormone levels.
  • Bleeding irregularities may resolve over time or by changing to a different contraceptive. If the unscheduled bleeding or spotting is heavy or lasts for more than a few months, you should discuss this with your healthcare provider.
10. What if I miss my scheduled period when taking Tyblume™?
  • You may experience light periods with Tyblume. Most women taking Tyblume had periods lasting less than 5 days.
  • You may experience breakthrough bleeding (bleeding between periods) and spotting, especially during the first three months of taking Tyblume. It may take time for your body to adjust to the new hormone levels.
  • Bleeding irregularities may resolve over time or by changing to a different contraceptive. If the unscheduled bleeding or spotting is heavy or lasts for more than a few months, you should discuss this with your healthcare provider.
11. What if I want to become pregnant?

You can stop taking Tyblume whenever you want if you decide to become pregnant.

12. What should I expect in terms of cost and insurance coverage for Tyblume™?

Due to the low manufacturer cost associated with Tyblume, patients may pay as little as $10 with insurance and should pay no more than $35 without insurance for a one month supply. This should help to avoid any challenges or surprises at the pharmacy when filling a Tyblume prescription.

13. What should I expect in terms of cost and insurance coverage for Tyblume™?

Due to the low manufacturer cost associated with Tyblume, patients may pay as little as $10 with insurance and should pay no more than $35 without insurance for a one month supply. This should help to avoid any challenges or surprises at the pharmacy when filling a Tyblume prescription.

 

Download Price Card.

14. How do I take Tyblume™?

First, decide what time of day you want to take your tablet. For maximum contraceptive effectiveness, take tablets exactly as directed (one tablet orally at the same time every day). Take 1 Tyblume tablet every day, for 28 days, until the pack is empty. Then start a new pack.

 

Please note: The failure rate may increase if you miss tablets or do not take them as directed.

15. When can I start taking Tyblume™?

If you’re taking hormonal contraception for the first time, you can start on a day of your choosing, or choose to start on a Sunday. Pick a time of day which will be easy to remember and consider setting an alarm on your phone to help you remember.

16. If you are starting Tyblume™ and have not used a hormonal birth control method before:

Day 1 Start

  • Take the first tablet of the first pack without food during the first 24 hours of your period. · Take tablets once daily at the same time each day.
  • Begin each subsequent 28-day pack the day after taking the last peach tablet.

 

Sunday Start

  • Take the first tablet of the first pack without food the Sunday after your period starts, even if you are still bleeding. · Use a non-hormonal birth control method, such as a condom and spermicide, for the first 7 days.
  •  Take tablets once daily at the same time each day
  •  Begin each subsequent 28-day pack the day after taking the last white tablet.
17. If you are starting Tyblume™ and are switching from a different combination hormonal method, such as another pill, vaginal ring, or patch:
  • If you’re switching to Tyblume from a combined oral contraceptive (COC), start Tyblume on the day when the new pack of the previous COC would have been started
  •  If you’re switching to Tyblume from a transdermal system, start Tyblume on the day when next application would have been scheduled
  •  If you’re switching to Tyblume from a vaginal ring or injection, start Tyblume the day when next insertion or injection would have been scheduled
  • If you’re switching to Tyblume from an intrauterine system or implant, start Tyblume on the day of removal
18. What should I expect when I start taking Tyblume™?

You may experience breakthrough bleeding (bleeding between periods) and spotting, especially during the first three months of taking Tyblume. It may take time for your body to adjust to the new hormone levels. Talk to your healthcare provider if the unscheduled bleeding or spotting is heavy or lasts for more than 3-4 months

19. What should I do if I miss any pills?

I missed one white active tablet in Weeks 1, 2, or 3:
Take the missed active tablet as soon as possible, even if two active tablets are taken in one day. Continue taking one tablet a day until the pack is finished.

 

I missed two white active tablets in Week 1 or Week 2:
Take two active tablets as soon as possible. Then, take two active tablets the next day. This means taking 4 tablets in 2 days. Continue taking one tablet a day until the pack is finished.

 

Use additional non-hormonal contraception (such as condoms and spermicide) as back-up if you have sex within 7 days after missing tablets.

 

I missed two white active tablets in the third week OR three or more active tablets in a row in Weeks 1, 2, or 3:
Day 1 start:
Throw out the rest of the 28-day pack and start a new pack that same day.

 

Sunday start:
Continue taking one tablet a day until Sunday, then throw out the rest of the pack and start a new pack that same day.

 

Use additional non-hormonal contraception (such as condoms and spermicide) as back-up if you have sex within 7 days after missing tablets.

 

I missed one or more peach (inactive) tablets are missed in the fourth week:

Throw away the missed inactive tablets. Keep taking one tablet each day until the pack is empty. Back-up nonhormonal birth-control method is not needed but take the next pack on time.

10

You're about to continue to our partner site.

You will be able to schedule a live virtual appointment with a doctor for $0—and receive a prescription—without leaving your home!


← Stay on Tyblume®